War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0246 S.C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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this State and to destroy the railroad to Savannah. That road once destroyed, I think the State would return to its allegiance. I have directed Mr. Yulee to be arrested and brought here if possible. He is one of those beyond the pale of proclamation, but is said to be hostile to Davis, and might be induced to head a movement for a reconstruction if the President would pardon him. I thought it worth trying for. Refugees continue to flock in. We will soon have a large portion of the people of Florida east of the Saint John's River.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. P. HATCH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, August 17, 1864.

Captain W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 15th instant. The One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Regiment is the one assigned by me to be sent north. It will leave here on Sunday if the movement now being made is at that time completed. I intend to hold Magnolia as a point from which to start out cavalry raids, as it turns Baldwin. I think its occupation will prevent any movement on this place, and also the occupation of Baldwin by any small force. The cavalry will be used as fully as their horses will allow of. I hope to organize one company of Floridians immediately on the return of the present raid.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. P. HATCH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, August 17, 1864.

Brigadier General JOHN K. JACKSON,

Commanding Confederate Forces, East Florida:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 14th instant in regard to a Mrs. Price and another lady, supposed by you to have been murdered. If troops of this command are charged with the offenses mentioned by you, it will be my duty to my Government to investigate the circumstances and bring the guilty to punishment. How the matter can officially interest you or your predecessor in command I am unable to say. Mrs. Price was the wife of a loyal American citizen; she and her friend visited this town and were admitted in it as loyal citizens. The case is therefore one solely connected with this command, and cannot be made the subject of official correspondence with you. Believing, however, that you, equally with myself, will endeavor to prevent outrages of this character being committed by our respective forces, I feel it my duty to inform you that facts developed during the investigation lead to the supposition that if these women were outraged and murdered it was probably done by a Confederate scouting