War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0229 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., August 8, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM GURNEY, Commanding, Morris Island:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that in employing the fatigue details from Folly Island they be allowed to do any work there is at the dock or elsewhere at the rear and not be invariably sent to the extreme front. The regiments that give these details have had the opportunity lately to get their fair proportion of killed and wounded, such as has not been had by the One hundred and twenty-seventh New York Volunteers, Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Thirty-second U. S. Colored Troops, on this island, the former of which has not had a man killed during its two years of service. These regiments should as far as practicable do the work at the front.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. W. SCHAUFFLER,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., August 9, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM GURNEY, Commanding, Morris Island:

COLONEL: The brigadier-general commanding directs that you send a reliable and intelligent man during this night onto the island between Light-House Creek and Simkins. This man will remain there during the day to-morrow and closely observe Fort Sumter and its wharf. He should have a small boat hidden in Light-House Creek and should take some brush along with him to make a shade. There must be a guard kept at Light-House Creek while he is out.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. W. SCHAUFFLER,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, Fla., August 9, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of the South:

GENERAL: I have visited Baldwin, where there are now three regiments of infantry, a battery, and the Seventy-fifth Ohio. Scouts are made from there daily, and the thorough destruction of the railroad toward Lake City is being completed. We find the job of destroying a railroad a much more difficult one than the accounts of the raids in Virginia would lead one to suppose. We will be thorough with this one.

I yesterday reoccupied Magnolia, intending it as a point from which to start raids; also as a point for refugees and negroes to reach the river. As soon as the troops arrive I shall commence the movement. With the force at Baldwin I will threaten Lake City to cover the raid, which will sweep through Alachua and Marion and come out at Palatka. I will occupy that point temporarily, after the movement commences. The force that threatens Lake City will fall back to Magnolia, when no longer needed to cover the movement south, and will occupy a line near the river to prevent