War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0209 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

carry shelter-tents and six days' rations. You will encamp your men somewhere on the line of the railroad between Camp Milton and the first trestle this side of Camp Milton, near enough to the trestle to guard it from the enemy. You will first of all intrench yourself, making your position as strong as possible. After this is done you can turn your attention to destroying the enemy's line of fortifications.

You are sent to Camp Milton for the purpose of preventing the enemy from damaging the railroad. You will send out frequently scouting parties to make sure that the country is free from the scattering parties of the rebels.

Very respectfully, &c.,

M. BAILEY,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Jacksonville, August 1, 1864.

Captain W. L. M. BURGER,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the South:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that the force under my command have captured 2 large and valuable lighters at Palatka and a locomotive and 7 cars (4 box and 3 platform cars) near Callahan Station, on the railroad between Baldwin and Fernandina. The cars are in good condition. The locomotive, although temporarily disabled, can in a short time be sent put in good running order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. BIRNEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., August 2, 1864.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Chief of Staff, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your order of the 25th ultimo, accompanying the telegraphic order from General Grant of the 24th ultimo. I have at once made arrangements to comply with it. Brigadier-General Birney has been ordered to proceed at once to Fort Monroe, Va., and report to Major General Benjamin F. Butler with his brigade. This brigade only contained three regiments, the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, but in order to make it full I have added another regiment. This will make the strength of the brigade over 3,500 men, or over 2,500 effectives. The regiments are good, and only require a little more drill and service to make them first-rate. I would just as soon send the same number of white regiments, as these latter are sooner broken down with the heat and sickness in this climate. I thought it better, however, to send the regiments belonging to General Birney's brigade and consisting mainly of regiments raised by him. The transportation is all ready, and as soon as General Birney and two of his regiments can be brought from Florida the whole will sail for Fort Monroe and arrive as soon as this letter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

14 R R-VOL XXXV, PT II