War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0155 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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allowed. The men to have only a rubber blanket with an extra pair of socks. Those men who have no rubber blankets may take either a woolen blanket or overcoat.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Hilton Head, S. C., June 28, 1864.

Brigadier-General SAXTON:

I am instructed by the major-general commanding to direct that three (if possible, four) of your best regiments, including Colonel Montgomery's regiment and one light battery (four pieces and six caissons), be embarked on transports, and be at this point not later than 4 p. m. Thursday next. The troops so taken from your district will be under the command of yourself or General Potter. On arriving at this place you will report to Brigadier-General Hatch for orders and instructions. The men will be provided with three days' cooked rations of bread and meat and six days' rations of coffee and sugar and salt, in their knapsacks or haversacks, the former preferred. The men to carry 10 rounds of cartridges in each pocket in addition to what can be put in their cartridge-boxes; 40 rounds extra for each man will be put on each transport, to be stored in a safe place and one convenient to get at. The troops must be in light marching order. No baggage of any description will be allowed. The men to have only a rubber blanket with an extra pair of socks. Those men who are not provided with rubber blankets may take a woolen blanket or an overcoat. Ten days' rations in bulk will be put on each transport. One ambulance of each regiment will be taken; also one wagon for the battery, for grain and extra ammunition. Ten wagons have been directed to be placed on the transports sailing from this point. If the chief quartermaster cannot spare that many, he may call on your quartermaster cannot spare that many, he may call on your quartermaster for a few. Please send you chief quartermaster to Hilton Head immediately to make arrangements for the transportation you cannot furnish yourself.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 29, 1864.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Department of the South:

GENERAL: Your letter (confidential) of the 22nd instant, with plans of proposed steamers and ladders for the capture of Fort Sumter, is just received. Unless the iron-clads would advance and capture Charleston, and I think it is now pretty well demonstrated that they will do nothing of the kind, I do not understand the object of capturing that place at the present time. As the rebel batteries would concentrate their fire upon it, it could be held only with a great sacrifice of life, if at all. I see no possible good to result