War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0097 Chapter XLVII.} CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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headquarters of the condition of his guns and the steps he has taken to procure a change. You are again charged to locate this guard with precision; to give definite instructions, particularly to Colonel Beecher. A very small force at the boat stations along the river will answer. The utmost vigilance is required.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. GORDON,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

WASHINGTON, May 21, 1864.

COMMANDING GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF:

GENERAL: By direction of Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, your attention is called to following extract from inspection report of your department for March, 1864, viz:

U. S. FORCE IN DISTRICT OF WEST FLORIDA.

I cannot without neglecting my obvious duty fail to report again the urgent need which exists for in increase of the force in this district, especially he garrison at Fort Pickens. The inadequacy of the garrison, even for its ordinary requirements of guard, picket, and fatigue duty, and of keeping the works in repair, was fully explained in my report of 20th December, 1863, and now exists even more strongly charge, by expiration of enlistment, of a number of men from Company K, Second U. S. Artillery, and the necessity is greater, because latterly good evidence is offered that an active enemy in considerable force is operating on the line of the Montgomery and Pensacola Railroad as far as Pollard.

Apprehension for the safety of Fort Pickens might reasonably be entertained if a force of a few hundred men were to move in the night with secrecy and dispatch and an attack by escalade or a surprise were attempted. A force of at least 20 mounted men are urgently needed as patrols and vedettes on Santa Rosa Island, with an outpost some miles up to give warning of the movements of an enemy and to secure the fort and garrison against surprise. The garrison now is so weak that the pickets are only advanced about 300 yards from the fort, and there are but 10 men stationed on picket, at a distance of nearly 600 yards from each other.

Besides this much-needed small force of cavalry 150 infantry at least are required in addition to the present garrison to offer even a creditable defense, the present garrison hardly being strong enough to defend the gates and posterns and man the flank howitzers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT N. SCOTT,

Captain, Fourth U. S. Infantry, Aide-de-Camp.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Numbers 69.

Hilton Head, S. C., May 21, 1864.

The following-named officers are hereby announced on the staff of the brigadier-general commanding, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly:

First. Lieutenant Thomas J. Robinson, Twenty-first U. S. Colored Troops, acting assistant adjutant-general.

First Lieutenant Daniel G. McMartin, aide-de-camp.

By order of Brigadier General John P. Hatch:

W. L. M. BURGER,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

7 R R-VOL XXXV, PT II