War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0065 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Jacksonville, Fla., April 23, 1864.

Colonel A. L. HARRIS,

Commanding Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs that you will leave a sufficient number of men in camp for a guard, and proceed with the remainder on marches of 25 miles a day, by way of Saint Augustine, to the town of Volusia, on the Saint John's River. You are not to show yourself to people on the other side of the river; to picket all the fords and ferries in such a way as to prevent people passing from the east to the west side, allowing all persons to pass from the west to the east side, but not to go back. You will also place guards on the main roads running southward between Saint John's River and the ocean, the object being to prevent all passing from the east to the west side, so long as you are operating there. You will conceal your men as much as possible from persons on the west side. In passing southward you will make particular inquiries as to the probable supply of cattle from that region of the country. Your guard at Volusia will keep watch for the boat which will probably reach there, from Jacksonville, some time on Thursday. When the boat comes in sight you will call in all your pickets, and have your whole force as promptly as possible at Volusia Ferry. Your men will start with three days' cooked rations in haversacks, and with ten days' rations of hard bread, sugar, and coffee in knapsacks. Each officer and man will one blanket or overcoat. All other clothing will be left under guard at camp or stores. Three 4-horse teams may be taken, loaded with oats. No hay will be taken.

The object of the general commanding is to protect and conciliate the people on the east side of the river; their property will be protected, and any man caught pillaging from a loyal citizen may be shot on the spot. parties engaged as pies in the rebel cause, or in catching rebel deserters, will be summarily punished. You will be careful to arrive at Volusia on or before noon on Thursday. In case the boat does not arrive before Sunday morning, you will use your command in driving cattle to Jacksonville.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. M. HALL,

First Lieutenant, First U. S. Artillery, A. A. A. G.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Jacksonville, Fla., April 23, 1864.

Colonel WILLIAM H. NOBLE,

Commanding Post, Saint Augustine:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs that on the receipt of this you will select a competent officer and a sufficient number of men from your command to guard Fort Marion; one or two companies will probably be sufficient. With the rest you will march so as to arrive at Volusia at noon next Thursday.

Your men will be provided with three days' cooked rations, and twelve days' rations of hard bread, sugar, and coffee in knapsacks. Neither overcoat nor blanket will be allowed, and each man will have

5 R R-VOL XXXV, PT II