War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0037 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

has water transportation for about 5,000; consequently he must make two trips, unless vessels can be sent to him from the North. There are two colored regiments (1,800 men) at Annapolis to be sent to South Carolina, and a third will probably be ready in about a week. Can vessels be sent with these an bring back Gillmore's command? Can any vessels be sent for troops to Department of the South?

Please give memorandum to Captain Scott, or see me before 2 o'clock.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

April 5, 1864-2.30 p. m.

major VAN VLIET,

Quartermaster, New York:

SIR: It is reported that the Cahawba, Fulton, United States, El Cid, Weybosset, are in New York. Send one of them to Annapolis to transport colored troops thence to Port Royal. Prepare the rest to sail for Port Royal, fully coaled and watered, as soon as the storm is over. They will receive orders from General Gillmore on arrival.

Report any other steamers at New York, ar arriving, with their capacity, and report capacity of vessels sailing under this order, and time of sailing.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, April 5, 1864-3 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel H. BIGGS,

Chief Quartermaster, Fort Monroe:

SIR: Send the Spaulding to Annapolis immediately to take a colored regiment thence to hilton Head. Have you any other steamer fit eh this purpose to go with her? The steamers should not leave the Chesapeake until the storm is over and should have coal and water to go farther, after reaching Hilton Head, where they will report to General Gillmore for further orders.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., April 5, 1864-6.30 p. m.

(Received 12 m., 6th)

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

Your telegram received. Spaulding is at New Berne. Storm renders it impossible for any vessel to go to Annapolis. I have the Montauk and two other similar propellers, that have come in for shelter. They can go to sea and carry 800 men. General Butler would like to know when he can count on returns on his transportation. I will telegraph you as soon as storm will admit of any vessel