War of the Rebellion: Serial 066 Page 0011 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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will endanger our defenses here. I will have the men ready, but while they are absent will not be responsible for what may happen. The First Brigade has not a man on this island that can be detailed for any purpose; the Second has present 2,000. Of these over 300 are without arms and 400 have just received arms; 450 are on special duty on boat infantry, and other purposes; 150 re the garrison of Shaw and can't be disturbed; then take out the cooks, musicians, &c., and there will be nobody left to call upon. I respectfully protest against troops taken from this island for any purpose.

W. W. H. DAVIS,

Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, March 8, 1864.

Brigadier General J. W. TURNER,

Chief of Artillery:

GENERAL: I have again to urge that guns may be provided here, without delay, of such a nature as will indicate that we may not evacuate this place in a hurry. If they are not to be expected, I beg that I may be so informed; if they are, that I be advised of the probable time of their arrival here. Rather than experience delay, I shall be glad to have any siege guns, 24-pounder James rifles, 8-inch siege howitzers, carronades, 24-pounders, anything of a tolerably heavy caliber and size. Two or three such might be spared from Fort Pulaski, perhaps.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. SEYMOUR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, March 12, 1864.

More guns than General Seymour asked for have already been sent him

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Jacksonville, Fla., March 8, 1864.

Brigadier General J. W. TURNER,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have to inform you that there is nothing further to report, except that a force of infantry has been moved by the rebels to the King's road, and there are indications of defensive measures being taken by them on the Six-Mile or Cedar Creek. Deserters come in constantly and report that if they knew that they would be kindly treated, and not sent North, many more would come to us. One recently from Dalton, Ga., gives a firm conviction that when the time of service is out (May 1), many of the rebel regiments will stack their arms and refuse to fight longer. If guns were here so that I could place strong confidence in the resistive power of these