War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0543 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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SAVANNAH, January 24, 1864.

General S. COOPER:

Department letter 16th instant received. I supposed President desired to know all orders and instructions given to district commanders. My specific answer to your inquiry of December 26 is that I do not propose abandoning my present lines of defense in Third Military District of South Carolina, or anywhere else, without contesting every foot of ground to extent of my means, but have advised planters near Savannah Railroad, who have addressed me on the subject, to remove their negroes liable to fall into hands of enemy. Mr. Roberts' letter has been referred to General Walker for his remarks.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., January 24, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Savannah, Ga.:

Lieutenant Rhame, through General Ripley, reports no buoys have been placed in Dewees Inlet. Captain Walpole, through General Taliaferro, reports that musketry firing for an hour was heard in direction of Morris Island at 9 a. m. on 23rd instant. No change in fleet inside bar. Few shots fired at city to-day. Seven shots fired at Sumter yesterday.

JNO. M. OTEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MOUNT PLEASANT, January 25, 1864.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN:

I have information that balloons have gone up for the last three nights from Capers' Island; they have not gone up in the daytime. the object must have been to discover camp-fires, I have given directions to insure their seeing a number of them after to-night, and shall commence rocket practice. Shall also send a reconnoitering party in that direction.

R. S. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General.

Forward to Savannah if General Jordan is there.

R. S. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Savannah, January 25, 1864.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: When I assumed command of this department in September, 1862, I found no officer on the staff of my predecessor charged with the duties of chief commissary, and I made no change, in part because the senior commissary, Major Locke, was absent from my headquarters, usefully employed in Georgia.