War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0507 Chapter XLVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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Report upon the state of subsistence at the post of Sullivan's Island, under charge of Major J. R. Robertson, commissary of subsistence, January 5, 1864.

Articles. Quantity. Rations. Remarks.

Bacon.

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Hard bread ........pounds 87,661 87,661

Equal to 260,

661

Flour ............barrels 760 133,000

bread rations

Meal ..............pounds 50,000 40,000

Rice ..................do 40,625

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Peas ..................do 2,300

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Sugar .................do 9,930

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Coffee ................do 270

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Candles ...............do 280

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Soap ..................do 841

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Salt .............bushels 211

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Whisky ...........gallons 135

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[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C.,

January 7, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Major Guerin, who will please report what promise there is from arrangements of the subsistence department for a supply of bacon or pork (fresh or salt) and for beef.

By command of General Beauregard:

JNO. M. OTEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY,

Charleston, January 7, 1864.

Respectfully returned.

My report of stores on hand made this day shows the stock of meats. The results are not encouraging, and future prospects are bad. Cattle are very scarce. It is said that many hogs have died of an epidemic. Since impressment has been virtually suspended by General Orders, 144, Adjutant and Inspector General's Office, it is doubtful if any bacon can be got until it is paid in as tax, and that will give the army but a few days' rations.

I respectfully suggest that an order be promptly issued restricting the shipment of all subsistence out of the State, and that after allowing liberal provision for the wants of the people the impressment law be rigidly enforced. Without an early remedy (an improved currency would be best) it will be very difficult to get bread before the year closes.

H. C. GUERIN,

Major and Commissary of Subsistence.

[Third indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., January 8, 1864.

I regret profoundly to be obliged again to bring this matter of the subsistence of the troops intrusted with the defense of Charleston to the attention of the War Department. The gravity of the state of affairs admitted by Major Guerin must be my excuse for the step.