War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0497 Chapter XLVII. CORESPONDENCE, ETC.-UION.

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field-work there to protect your communictions on the river, and, should you deem it expedient, will cause one to be constructed immediately.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. W. SMITH,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistan Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., February 28, 1864.

Brigadier General T. SEYMOUR,

Commanding District of Florida, Jacksonville, Fla.:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you cause the lumber obtained on Saint Mary's River to be stored at Fernandina, subject to orders from these headquarters. Requisitions for such amount of lumber as you may require will be made out and forwarded to these headquarters for approval. You will please instruct the commanding officer at Fernandina that the lumber must not be used by him for any purpose except by permission of the major-general commanding.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. W. SMITH,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

February 28,1 864.

Brigadier General J. W. TURNER,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt at this moment of a communication from department headquarters touching several points, upon which the major-general commanding gives directions:

First. That Yellow Bluff should be occupied. Yesterday morning Lieutenant Michie was sent to examine this locality, and this morning two companies went down to construct a block-house-which was all that was thought necessary at present-on he neck of the isthmus behind the bluff, should further defenses seem necessary when the ground is cleared of the almost impenetrable jungle that now covrs it.

Second. At present, while Baldwin is not in our hadns, I do not deem it essential that the railroad from Fenrnadina to Baldwin should be ocmpeted at this moment. Probably a little later it may be of consequence, but the railroad is so muchs horter by Jacksonville that it will be sufficient for all movements that can now be made.

Third. The lumber at Albertis' (I think Major Brooks informed me) is probably burned.

A saw-mill is expected to be in operation here soon (in a fort-night), and it may be advisable to send that from Folly Island, as a permanency here, for cutting for public purposes.

Fourth. As soon as this position is as complete as it should be I think it will be well to occupy Palatka, and to throw there a sufficient force, temporarily, to fortify it with rapidity.

32 R R-VOL XXXV, PT I