War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0442 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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STATION Numbers 3, ATLANTIC AND GULF RAILROAD,

August 20, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: Lieutenant Mole has not yet reported to me. I am in receipt of a dispatch from Captain Browning, whom I sent to McIntosh County, who reports that the enemy carried off-

Of Company F, Third South Carolina.......................... 38

Citizens.................................................... 5

Negroes..................................................... 51

----

Total....................................................... 94

The enemy destroyed the bridge over South Newport River. I have ordered Captain Browning to remain at Jonesville for the present.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. HOOD,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant J. HUNTER,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

AUGUST 29, 1864.-Skirmish at Milton, Fla.

Report of Brigadier General Alexander Asboth, U. S. Army, commanding District of West Florida.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST FLORIDA,

Barrancas, August 30, 1864.

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that I left Barrancas yesterday morning (29th instant), with 200 of the Second Maine Cavalry, two companies of the Nineteenth Iowa Infantry, and two pieces of the First Florida Battery, on the steamers Clinton and Planter, with a view to capture three new companies of rebel cavalry reported to be at Milton, Fla.

I arrived early in the forenoon at the mouth of the Bayou Mulatte, or Black Bayou, Escambia Bay, but being unable to enter it with the Clinton (she drawing 8 feet of water) the disembarkation of the cavalry was delayed till 3 p. m., when I proceeded to Milton, Fla., a distance of 9 miles, and after rebuilding the destroyed bridge on the Arcadia Creek, I came upon the enemy, about 100 strong, and consisting of Captain Goldsby's (Alabama) cavalry company and a new militia infantry company, mounted.

Having received early information of the arrival of two army steamers at Bayou Mulatte, the enemy had sent his stores on seven wagons in time toward Pollard, and seemed prepared and decided to accept a fight in the camp at the upper end of the town, but fled, upon our impetuous charge, in all directions. We pursued them closely for 7 miles, and captured 4 privates of Goldsby's company and 3 colored men, mounted and armed, with 7 horses and 5 mules with equipments, and 20 Austrian rifles.

Returning to Milton late in the evening I gave rest and food to men and horses, and started at 1 o'clock this morning back to Mulatte Bayou, where I commenced re-embarking at daylight, and arrived and disembarked here at Barrancas at 6 p. m., without any loss except 1 horse killed after total exhaustion.