War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0321 Chapter XLVII. THE FLORIDA EXPEDITION.

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wounded of the enemy, with five pieces of artillery and large number of small-arms. Number of prisoners not yet known, but being brought in constantly. His cavalry is in pursuit. Our loss about 250 killed and wounded, including many brave officers and men, whom we mourn.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond, Va.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 23, 1864-2.15 p.m.

Latest report from General Finegan gives no particulars of victory at Ocean Pond, except that he has taken all enemy's artillery, some 500 or 600 stand of small-arms already collected, and that roads for 3 miles are strewed with enemy's dead and wounded. He reports General Gillmore at Jacksonville. Enemy said to be 10,000 strong. Our force not half that number at time of battle, all re-enforcements sent not having then reached him.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond, Va.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., March 25, 1864.

GENERAL: In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida I have to accompany them, for the information of the War Department, with the following:

The officer in observation at Foot Point of the enemy's fleet in the waters of Port Royal and Broad River having reported on the afternoon of January 14 that some thirty-five vessels, including an iron-clad from Hilton Head, had gone to sea in the fog of the day before, and probably with troops, as it was observed to be more quiet on the adjacent islands (less drumming and firing of small-arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions to keep strict watch in the direction of Wassaw Sound and the Ossabaw. At the same time orders were given to the proper staff officers to hold means of transportation by rail in readiness on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. An increase of the tents of the enemy on Tybee Island was also observed and reported.

On January 16, I repaired in person to Savannah, in which quarter I apprehended some operations might be looked for. I remained in the District of Georgia, inspecting the troops and works, until February 3, when, there being no indication of any movement of the enemy in that direction, I returned to Charleston, leaving with Major-General Gilmer orders to hold the Sixty-fourth Georgia Volunteers, the First Florida Battalion, and a light battery in readiness to be sent to Florida at short notice.

On February 7 (received 8th), Brigadier-General Finegan reported by telegraph that five gun-boats and two transports of the enemy had made their appearance in the Saint John's, within 5 miles of Jacksonville, and on the next day announced the arrival at Jackson-

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