War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0318 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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menced retiring in good order, just after I spoke to the general, and then I met one f McCrea's guns coming off, with some men carrying him, wounded in both legs. He, too, had lost a gun, and himself and others were wounded in attempting to get it off. As regards my support there was no appearance of an organization of our people on my left or immediate front. I saw a number of men of colored regiments in groups of from 2 up to 10, very much excited and huddling behind my caissons and some of them firing through and over the battery. I saw 2 officers with them, but only for an instant. One of them tried to wave them on with his sword; 5 or 6 followed him about ten steps and then all retreated. The color bearer, a large, powerful man, with a blue regimental flag, remained on the left of my guns, where Metcalf had been, and near my piece; he stood there manfully and bravely to the last, and with but 2 or 3 companions, sometimes entirely alone; what became of him I am unable to say. I saw many wounded colored soldiers appearing suddenly in front and on my left, without muskets, and it appeared as if they had been lying down and taken the first opportunity to get to the rear. Some of the infantry, while facing the enemy and firing wildly, did not show fear, nor did I see any of them absolutely run off, but groups of them huddled together and did nothing, and many were in this position shot, while they seemed unconscious that they were hit. I desired them to take to the trees with a hope that I would thus in a measure draw off the fire of the enemy. It is my impression that this portion of the regiment had been broken, and retreated from the front before I came up, and the appearance of my caissons reassured them to take to the trees with a hope that I would thus in a measure draw off the fire of the enemy. It is my impression that this portion of the regiment had been broken, and retreated from the front before I came up, and the appearance of my caissons reassured them and brought them again up to the flag. At the time I drew off, and when I could fire no longer, I saw a large body of the enemy in front advancing slowly and waving their hats and shouting. They halted, apparently, but did not charge the guns. This was the Nineteenth and Twenty-eighth Georgia, as stated by their own papers. They contented themselves with shooting at a distance every man who appeared near the guns.

I take this occasion-and it is one of the redeeming features of the whole affair-to speak of the good conduct of First Sergeant Bach, Sergeant Lane, and particularly of Sergeant Sweetman (badly wounded), Corporal McChesney (wounded), and Corporals Kinsman and Delany. I cannot mention all the privates engaged, but I have no reason to believe that any one of them acted otherwise than well.

I lost 28 horses killed, principally at the pieces, 11 wounded, and 11 men killed on the field, and 23 wounded, besides Lieutenant Tully McCrea, of whose gallantry the general was a nearer witness than myself.

I would take this occasion to recommend to the favorable notice of the general, Dr. J. H. Janeway, whose ambulance was twice removed to the rear to get it out of fire. He took, charge of the whole artillery wounded, and putting the two ambulances together, and assisted by his junior, Assistant Surgeon Hillary, he was assiduous in his duties. To his watchful care we owe much in the safety of the wounded officers, and on his arrival at Jacksonville he quickly established a hospital, and thus collected and cared for the wounded that he had not dispatched to Hilton Head.

That I unavoidably lost my guns, and that the enemy estimate their capture as being greater than that of a regiment, is my only