War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0273 Chapter XLVII. AFFAIR AT BAYOU GRAND, FLA.

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I shall send these prisoners to Kingstree on Monday next, and respectfully request that they be met there by a detachment from Charleston in order that my men may return immediately. I require the services of them all.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

No. 2. Report of Major William P. White, Twenty-first Battalion Georgia Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS CAMP TRAPIER,

Waccamaw Forces, January 26, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In conformity to General Orders, No. 128, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, paragraph 1, I feel it a duty incumbent on me, as well as a pleasure, to notice the meritorious conduct of Junior Second Lieutenant Thomas Young and Private Lemuel Robertson, both of Company C, Twenty-first Georgia Cavalry Battalion, who gallantly charged upon 25 Abolitionists on Dubardu Beach, Waccamaw, S. C., on the 7th instant, armed with cutlasses and pistols, and aided in compelling them to lay down their arms and surrender when there was no supporting forces within three-quarters of a mile of the parties. To my surprise, instead of one volley at least, the whole party, commanded by a lieutenant of the U. S. Navy, obeyed the summons, were taken prisoners, and were delivered up to your order.

Very respectfully, yours,

WM. P. WHITE,

Major, Commanding Twenty-first Georgia Cav. Battalion.

Captain WILLIAM GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JANUARY 25, 1864.-Affair at Bayou Grand, Fla.

Report of Brigadier General Alexander Asboth, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF PENSACOLA,

Barrancas, Fla., January 27, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit, in connection with my report of January 10, No. 20, in regard to rebel movements in my neighborhood the following additional information:

Off Mobile the gun-boat Tennessee is not yet over the bar; the small steamer Boston, with two guns and forty bales of cotton, is ready to run the blockade for Havana. The garrison at Mobile was increased with five regiments of infantry from Montgomery. There are in all now eight regiments, 500 to 700 strong each. Fort Morgan is garrisoned at present by 1,000 men; Fort Grant by 300. The rebel force at Pollard is 1,200, employed toward Milton and on the railroad toward Mobile. The cavalry that were stationed between the Blackwater and Escambia have been ordered to Mobile and their

18 R R-SERIES XXXV, PT I