War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0270 S.C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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A desultory fire was kept up from the other pieces against the enemy whenever he became visible. Our line on the right was at once rectified, and in a new minutes there was nothing but desultory firing, and by 6 p.m. that also ceased.

I started at 6.30 p.m. to return to Adams' Run, but meeting General Robertson at Church Flats reported to him there and accompanied him to Steven's next morning. The occurrences of the following day, as far as the artillery is concerned, will be detailed in another report.

My thanks are due to Sergeant Seabrook for zeal and coolness in performance of duty.

I have the honor to be, captain, your obedient servant,

DEL. KEMPER,

Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery.

Captain JOHNSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Number of rounds expended in action from 6th to 9th, inclusive:

10-pounder Parrott:

Shell...............................................164

Canister............................................ 19

12-pounder Napoleon:

Shell............................................... 73

Canister............................................ 6

Solid shot.......................................... 21

12-pounder howitzers:

Shell...............................................221

Canister............................................ 33

Total number of rounds (458 shell, 58 canister, and

21 solid shot)......................................537

HDQRS. SECOND AND SIXTH MILITARY DISTRICT,

OFFICE OF CHIEF OF ARTILLERY,

Adams' Run, July 16, 1864.

CAPTAIN: Daybreak on Saturday, 9th instant, found the artillery on John's Island, consisting of Parker's four 12-pounder Napoleons, Walter's two 10-pounder Parrotts and two 12-pounder Napoleons, and Charles' two 12-pounder howitzers, disposed as follows, viz: All the pieces distributed at convenient intervals along the line of infantry, except Walter's two Napoleons, under Lieutenant Salvo, which were placed near Curtis' to guard our flank and rear. By General Robertson's orders the infantry moved forward at dawn and easily drove the enemy from his front line of works. I then advanced two pieces of artillery (a 12-pounder Napoleon of Parker's battery, under Lieutenant Wilkins, and a 12-pounder howitzer of Charles' battery, under Lieutenant Logan) and put them in position to cover Burden's Causeway. The musketry fire of the enemy, however, being very heavy, induced Colonel Harrison to withdraw Lieutenant Wilkins (who was nearest the causeway and in the road) about 100 yards toward the rear, the determination of the general not to advance farther in the face of such overwhelming odds rendering the preservation of the causeway of no moment. A few rounds were fired from Lieutenant Murdoch's Napoleons, on our left, and 1 shell tried from the Parrotts in the center, which, bursting