War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0259 Chapter XLVII. OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, ETC.

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and Tynes, from my experience last night. If a determined enemy had landed a thousand men in barges, with gun-boats within supporting distance, it would have been extremely difficult to have held these two batteries, and still more difficult to have dislodged them after the batteries were silenced. We had but a single regiment of infantry within reach, and that weakened by a heavy detail for picket duty. Take in connection with this the distance between Tynes and Pringle, at any point of which boats can land, and it will readily be seen how our present defenseless condition at this part of the line is calculated to make one feel uneasy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. SIMONTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain P. N. PAGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS WEST LINES,

James Island, April 15, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that this afternoon, about 4.30 p.m., a two-mast gun-boat cam up the Stono as far as Legare's place, on John's Island, about 3 1/2 miles from Pringle, and opened fire on our picket-line. At the same time a force, estimated between 100 and 200 of infantry, crossed over from Horse Island to Battery Island, and advanced to the causeway leading to James Island, nearly up to the broken bridge. Also at the same time the enemy opened with a sort of rocket, throwing an iron projectile about 2 feet long, filled with powder and intended to explode. These came from Dixon's Island, but not from the battery. They fired a very short time; when the firing ceased the gun-boat went back. The enemy left Battery Island and destroyed the bridge leading to Horse Island behind them. Our pickets did not leave posts, and the enemy did not come in collision with any of them at the range of small-arms. While the gun-boat was up the river she fired 5 shots at Pringle. The first shot struck in the river about 200 yards above the battery; the second about the same distance to the left, on the land; the third in the river just below the bridge; the fourth fell short about a mile, and the fifth passed directly over the battery, falling in the field in rear. No one was hurt, and all is quiet.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. SIMONTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain P. N. PAGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS WEST LINES,

James Island, May 13, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that this morning about sunrise a party of 15 of the enemy landed at the extreme point of the peninsula running to the left of Legare house and nearly opposite Long Island. After landing they at once captured Corporal Moorer, Second South Carolina Artillery, and 4 men, who were there on post, and who apparently made no resistance. After capturing these men the enemy returned to Long Island. A small picket is kept at this