War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0184 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA., COAST. Chapter XLVII.

Search Civil War Official Records

rott shots also struck. I ordered the steamer to return to the city before her charge had been entirely discharged, as she was in evident danger. No injury was done to the work and no casualties occurred. No injury was done to the work and no casualties occurred. The firing continues this morning from guns. The thick weather obscures the fleet. A tug was lying very close in at daylight this morning; I think she could have been struck by Sullivan's Island guns.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. ELLIOTT, JR.,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT SUMTER, January 29, 1864.

The fire is from there 10-inch columbiads, and a 30-pounder Parrott is directed at the south angle, where some open arches have been recently filled from the outside, and which we suspect they have seen. Work going on as usual, and no damage done.

S. ELLIOTT, JR.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT SUMTER, January 29, 1864-11 p. m.

Shots fired from 10-inch columbiads, 8-inch Parrott, 6-inch Parrott, 40 and 30 pounder Parrots at south angle, 156; 129 hit. Mortar shells fired, 13; 7 hit. Damage, trifling. Casualties, 1 man wounded in ankle.

S. ELLIOTT, JR.,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT SUMTER, January 30, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that at daylight yesterday the enemy commenced his fire with a 30-pounder, a 100-pounder, a 200-pounder Parrott, and a 10-inch columbiad; 156 shots were fired, 129 of which struck. The south angle was the object of their aim; an hour's work at dark repaired the injury it received. At 3 p. m. the flag staff was shot down; it was first replaced upon a small and afterwards upon a larger staff by Private F. Schafer, Company A, Lucas' battalion, who stood on the top of the traverse and repeatedly waved the flag in the sight of the enemy. He was assisted by Corpl. L. Bressentiam and Private Charles Banks, of the same corps, and by Mr. H. B. Middleton, of the Signal Corps, who is acting as adjutant of the post in the absence of the regular officer.

They were exposed to a rapid and accurate fire of shells. At the close of the scene Schafer, springing from a cloud of the smoke and dust of the bursting shell, stood long waving his hat in triumph. It was a most gallant deed, and the effect upon the garrison was