War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0178 S. C., FLA., AND ON THE GA. COAST. Chapter XLVII.

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to its length of both extremities would be an improvement. While the work of laying was going on Fort Johnson fired 3 shots in this direction; fortunately no harm was done. I understand that the sentinel though he saw and heard musketry at this post. As we had two steamers and a feet of small boats here, the risk to property was very great. The batteries being near the telegraph office, I was able to check it before our range had been attained. I recommend that Fort Johnson be no longer included among our supporting batteries. The distance is too great and the required adjustment of aim too nice for good results to be attained, and the probability is that the effect upon the garrison will be more injurious than upon the enemy. The difficulty is not owing to nay defect in the skill of our artillerists, but belongs to the nature of the case.

At 4.20 a. m. this morning the alarm signal was made by the navy guard-boat, which afterward reported two small boats and a monitor approaching. The parapet had been manned, and was kept so until daylight, as the night was peculiarly favorable to an assault. No observation this morning. Weather thick.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. ELLIOTT, JR.,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUMTER, January 5, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report the Ironsides, 4 monitors, 2 wooden gun-boats, 2 mortar-boats, and 15 sailing vessels inside; 5 steamers, 7 schooners, and 1 steam derrick in Light-House Inlet. The latter has always been there, but has not heretofore been specially reported. Ships in the offing not visible; fog last night very thick. Multiplied the sentinels by 10; work going on Morris Island, but apparently not in the way of any change. One of the crew of the guard-boat shot himself through the hand while at the wharf; injured part successfully removed by Major Rhett, surgeon in charge.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. ELLIOTT, JR.,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON.

FORT SUMTER, January 10, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that Captain J. B. Allston, 6 officers, and 100 men, from Twenty-seventh South Carolina Volunteers, relieved Captain Hammond, 6 officers, and 100 men, from Twenty-fifth South Carolina Volunteers. The steamer left the wharf without a proper head of steam and began drifting with the tide below the fort. Seeing that she ran great risk of being fired into by Sullivan's Island, as well as by the enemy, I directed both the telegraphic and signal operators to call Sullivan's Island. They tried for twenty minutes, from 12.30 to 12.50, without success. At the wharf; injured part successfully removed by Major Rhett, surgeon in charge.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. ELLIOTT, JR.,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Lieutenant S. C. BOYLSTON.

FORT SUMTER, January 10, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that Captain J. B. Allston, 6 officers, and 100 men, from Twenty-seventh South Carolina Volunteers, relieved Captain Hammond, 6 officers, and 100 men, from Twenty-fifth South Carolina Volunteers. The steamer left the wharf without a proper head of steam and began drifting with the tide below the fort. Seeing that she ran great risk of being fired into by Sullivan's Island, as well as by the enemy, I directed both the telegraphic and signal operators to call Sullivan's Island. They tried for twenty minutes, from 12.30 to 12.50, without success. At the