War of the Rebellion: Serial 065 Page 0147 Chapter XLVII. OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

them there. There was no time or opportunity to attempt any ambuscade or movement of finesse. I accompanied Colonel harris and Major Jenkins in front, and in an hour we found the enemy had fled, leaving their dead along the way, obstructing the roads, and burning the houses and bridge at the Haulover; and we found that there they had constructed a redoubt and converted a long ditch bank into a good line of breast-works. Thus ended their three day's incursion.

The accompanying rough sketch* will give you a general idea of the field of operations. The maps of John's Island are extremely inaccurate, and a good one ought to be prepared.

I have received as yet no reports of casualties. Major Jenkins lost some 13 men, to wit, Captain Humphrey's company of cavalry (the Cadets), 9-2 killed, 3 wounded, and 4 prisoners. Captain Humphrey himself wounded in two places, but here in the hospital doing well.

In all...................................................... 10

Stono Scouts................................................ 1

Jennett's company, Fifty-ninth Virginia Volunteers,

killed (1), wounded (2), and captured (1)................... 4

---

Total loss on Tuesday, 9th.................................. 15

Our loss Wednesday, 10th none.

Our loss on Thursday, 11th (Twenty-sixth Virginia Volunteers),

wounded..................................................... 2

---

Grand total................................................. 17

Of the enemy, 4 bodies were found along the road, and some 4 or 5 were found buried. We also found the buried bodies of our dead, and have sent them to their families. We buried the enemy's dead. From the account of the last prisoner which fell into our hands their whole loss was, killed, 14; wounded, 15; captured, 5; total, 34. We found 3 of their horses killed, Captain Humphrey's horse was killed and Major Jenkins' wounded.

Light as the casualties are, there is a high roll of merit. Major Jenkins cannot be commended too highly for his conduct of the defense until he was re-enforced. He had but few men, and though he lost but 15 out of 150, it was not because he did not lead them into the thickest of danger. He at once repaired the surprise of his pickets and fought so closely and managed so masterly as to make the enemy think him strong. He maintained his ground until we could save the island. He deserves promotion, and I ask it for him. So also does Captain Humphrey. He was devotedly daring, and dashed upon ten times his number; was first in the fight and last out of it. And Major Jenkins speaks in high terms of Captain Jennett and his company. Some few of both Humphrey's and Jennett's companies straggled, but they are marked.

All of the officers and men behaved well under my eye. General Colquitt, with the Georgia troops and the officers and men of the Fifty-ninth, Twenty-sixth, Fourth, and Forty-sixth Virginia Volunteers; the cavalry, commanded by Captain Whilden, and the artillery, exceeded my expectations in their promptitude in bringing up re-enforcements. My total effective force on th evening of the 11th on the ground was 1,850 infantry, two batteries of artillery, and about 100 cavalry. The force of the enemy was 2,000 at least, with a reserve of 300 at the Haulover. They had [been] re-enforced on Tuesday night.

---------------

*Not found.

---------------