War of the Rebellion: Serial 064 Page 0554 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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SAINT JOSEPH, MO., June 25, 1864.

Colonel O. D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to request that the letters and telegrams to myself from the major-general commanding, relative to the calling into service of the Enrolled Missouri Militia of this district, be carefully examined, and that the censure for irregularity and reproof for exceeding my authority, this day administered from department headquarters, be withdrawn.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, MO., June 25, 1864.

Major-General PLEASONTON:

All orders that have been issued from these headquarters calling militia into service were issued in conformity to orders from Major-General Rosecrans, from whom I received my authority to call out or relieve militia. Said authority was revoked by Colonel Greene, assistant adjutant-general, thee 23rd instant, and I have since that date ceased to order any militia into service.

C. B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, MO., June 25, 1864.

Major-General PLEASONTON:

I have the honor to request that you name to me the instance in which I have made order calling into service the enrolled Missouri Militia without express authority from Major-General Rosecrans.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISIANA, PIKE COUNTRY, MO., June 25, 1864.

Brigadier General CLINTON B. FISK:

MY DEAR SIR AND FRIEND: The Louisiana National Union League, in session to-night, having read and signed a document to you for your consideration in regard to the disbanding of Captain H. Baxter's company of Enrolled Missouri Militia, the action has produced a very great despondency of spirit and feeling among the Union element of this city and its vicinity. To be candid with you, my dear friend, the members of the Union League and many others not members (but truly loyal in this vicinity) have good cause to be afraid of danger, for persons and property of Union men, I understand, have been threatened by rebels and rebel sympathizers. The general feeling among the Union men of this place is insecurity. They are liable any night to destruction. Hence, my dear friend General Fisk, a terrific spirit is beginning to kindle among the Union masses fearful to contemplate. They feel as if the proper authorities of the State had forsaken them, and that the mantle of Federal and State had forsaken them, and that the mantle of Federal and State authority was to be continually thrown around the rebels and rebel sympathizers.

Consequently whit the disbandment of the aforesaid company the last vestige of hope has gone, except in their own individual and