War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 1062 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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it very difficult for you to communicate with him. General Price's infantry, with he exception of Fagan's brigade, has been ordered to this point, whence the lieutenant-general commanding directs that you put yourself in communication with General Price, and also that you push your scouts well up toward Monticello and give information to department headquarters and to General Price of any movement of the enemy in that direction. General Price reports the enemy concentrating at Pine Bluff preparatory, as he supposes, to an advance upon Camden. In the opinion of the lieutenant-general commanding it is much more probable that he will move in the direction of Monticello and Bastrop toward Monroe, so as to put himself in easy communication and co-operation with any force operating on the Ouachita; besides, this will bring him through a country abounding in supplies; whereas the route by Camden is over a barren waste, affording no sustenance for man or beast. The lieutenant-general commanding expresses the hope that the cotton east of the Ouachita, and which has not been disposed of by the Government, has been destroyed. If not, he directs that you burn without delay all within your reach answering this description.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, La., March 20, 1864.

Brigadier General S. B. MAXEY,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The enemy, supposed to be from 15,000 to 20,000 strong, hold Alexandria. General Taylor is between that point and Natchitoches. General Price anticipates an advance from Pine Bluff. It may become necessary for him to fall back upon Shreveport. Should this be the case the lieutenant-general commanding directs that you dispose your command so as to cover the crossings of Red River in the vicinity of Fulton and those above that point. General Price's line of retreat would be east and south of Fulton, so that the road by that point would be left uncovered. A detailed map of the fortifications at Fulton and of the surrounding country will be sent you in a day or two. The lieutenant-general commanding suggests that you put yourself in communication with General Price.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, La., March 20, 1864.

Major-General PRICE:

GENERAL: I send you an extract* of General Taylor's last dispatch, from which it appears up to the 17th instant the enemy had not advanced beyond Alexandria. General Price's infantry, with the exception of Fagan's brigade, has been ordered to this point, whence

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*Not found; but see Taylor to Boggs, March 18, Part I, p.497.

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