War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 1003 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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toward Texas, and at what other point supplies are deposited, or can be conveniently deposited, with a view to this expedition. State also what quantity of stores are now in the vicinity of Cuero, Victoria, and other places, and such other information as will tend to enable the major-general commanding to decide upon the successful co-operation of the proposed attack.

Very respectfully,

E. P. TURNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HOUSTON, February 28, 1864.

Brigadier-General BEE:

I am instructed by Major-General Magruger to request that you will inform him if there is still any corn remaining on the Navidad, and will also state what quantity of corn has been deposited at Elliot's Ferry and at the point 12 miles beyond in the direction of Texana. The general commanding contemplates, if such a course should not, after all the information is received, be deemed by him inadvisable, to move several cavalry, regiments in the direction of Indianola from your command, as has been indicated to you in a previous letter of this date, and with this view he wishes Woods' and Pyron's regiment to be remounted.

You will please report the most expeditious method of doing the same. It can be done either by ordering the horses to meet them at some convenient point on the line to Indianola or by sending for their horses and having them brought to their present encampment. Buchel's regiment, already mounted, will, if you adopt the former plan, be ordered by you to join these two regiment at the point above referred to, so that the whole may move together under the command of the ranking officer. These three regiments will move to that quarter when mounted. The general wishes and early reply.

Very respectfully,

E. P. TURNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD,

Camp Sidney Johnston, February 28, 1864.

Brigadier General J. E. SLAUGHTER,

Chief of Staff:

SIR: I inclose copy of communication from Colonel Duff. I respectfully request permission to attack Indianola. My scouts went within 3 miles of Decrow's point on Friday and encountered no enemy. The people laving in the vicinity told them that most of the enemy had left, and the intention was to abandon the peninsula, removing what stores they had to Fort Esperanza, which is guarded with negroes. Some think that the enemy are going to Powder Hirn, others to New Orleans. I shall send Colonel Buchel down to-morrow with a strong scout. There are many reasons in favor of an attack on Indianola; among them may be mentioned no probability of attack at mouth of Caney, unhealthy location of this camp, distance from supplies, scarcity of transportation, dissatisfied