War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0973 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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General Walker will endeavor to drive the jayhawkers from the lower part of the swamps up toward you and Captain Smith, and the major-general commanding expects that you will soon clear them out of that part of the country. The major-general commanding directs that the orders to you with regard to these jayhawkers be reiterated, viz, to hunt them down with the utmost severity and shoot every one of them found with arms in their hands making resistance. You will send the inclosed communication to Captain Smith without delay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. MAY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

ALEXANDRIA, LA., February 16, 1864.

Captain G. W. SMITH,

Commanding Company:

CAPTAIN: I am directed by the major-general commanding to say to you that Major Wiche has been directed to move his command down to jacob Paul's, on the opposite side of the swamp to where you are operating, and act in conjunction with you against the jayhawkers. General Walker will endeavor to drive the jayhawkers from the lower part of the swamp up toward you, and the major-general commanding relies on your clearing the country of them soon. The major-general commanding directs that while you are engaged on this special duty against jayhawkers that you will report direct to these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. MAY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA,

Houston, February 16, 1864.

Brigadier General W. R. BOGGS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: When I was satisfied in June last that Vicksburg would fall, I called upon the Governor of the State of Texas for 10,000 State troops, first, because the conscript law had been so unsuccessfully enforced as to make me hopeless of getting out the conscripts; second, because we were deficient in arms, and by agreeing to receive such of the State troops as cavalry who armed and equipped themselves I would develop all the private arms in the State; third, because, under the militia law, I could obtain as soldiers all between the ages of eighteen and fifty years exempt under the conscription act; fourth, because I know it would take from four to six months to organize these State troops, and it was certain to my mind that an invasion would take place within that period.

The then Governor, F. R. Lubbock, expressly disclaimed on the part of the State any pretensions to the conscript element in the State troops, and thus that element could be easily transferred to the old organizations should the Legislature, which would convene in November, fail to legislate the troops into the Confederate service for the war.