War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0972 Chapter XLVI. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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holding high positions under the Lincoln Government, and who possess much influence, but they have signally failed in procuring the assent of the military authorities to any arrangements whereby supplies would be furnished to our army for cotton.

In no instance, therefore, should any cotton be allowed to pass from our lines to the enemy's unless goods or an equivalent have been previously received by us, and if any permission to export cotton on my other terms has been given, I would respectfully and earnestly recommend its revocation, and I would also suggest that no future purchases of cotton should be made by our authorities with a view to shipment to the enemy's lines. I feel satisfied that the Federal authorities will not deviate from their established policy to carry out the arrangement made with Captain Stevenson. My views upon the subject of the destruction of private cotton have undergone a decided change, and I am of the opinion that cotton belonging to private individuals should be destroyed whenever likely to fall into the hands of the enemy. So long as the Federals can receive cotton from our lines or have any prospect of procuring it by occupation of any portion of our territory, they will observe their existing policy and regulations prohibiting the shipment of supplies to us. I have given ordes directing the destruction of private cotton whenever it is in danger of falling into the enemy's hands.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. TAYLOR,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST LOUISIANA,

Alexandria, February 16, 1864.

Major General J. G. WALKER,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you will immediately dispatch the company of mounted men you have against the jayhawkers east of Red River. Instruct the officers in charge of the company to proceed to the swamp and endeavor to capture or force the jayhawkers up the swamp in the direction of Catahoula Lake. Major Wyche, with his battalion, and Captain G. G. Smith, commanding a company of mounted men, are operating up in that direction. The company you send out should commence work at the lower end of the swamp, I suppose somewhere in the neighborhood of Lake Larto. The officers in command of the company, the major-general commanding directs, shall be instructed to hunt the jayhawkers down with the utmost severity, and shoot any found with arms in their hands making resistance.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. MAY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

ALEXANDRIA, LA., February 16, 1864.

Major R. E. WICHE,

Commanding Battalion:

MAJOR: The major-general commanding directs that you will move your command down at once to Jacob Paul's, on the opposite side of the swamp to swamp to where Captain Smith, with his command, is operating, and act in conjunction with him against the jayhawkers.