War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0964 Chapter XLVI. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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[Inclosure Numbers 3.] STATE OF LOUISIANA, Parish of Saint Landry:

Be it know that day, the 13th of February, 1864, before me, the undersigned, justice of the peace in and for the above-named parish and State, personally came and appeared Terence Jeansanne, a resident of the said parish, who, being duty sworn, declared upon his oath that under orders from T. Lytt Lyon, captain and acting assistant commissary of subsistence, issued from the officer of depot commissary at Cheneyville, La., he proceeded with a squad of men to gather beeves for the army in the parish of Vermillion. That after gathering about 500 head of beeves they were surrounded by a squad of armed men, who, under pretense that they were organized or the purpose of protecting their property from illegal impressment and from robbery, ordered affiant to turn loose the beeves which he had gathered, robbed him of a bowie knife, the only army which he had about him, robbed two of his men of their revolvers (the only arms in affiant's squad), robbed another of the men of his saddle and blanket, robbed another of his mule, threatened to hang affiant, and took two away as prisoners. That said armed men told affiant their intention was to starve out the Confederate forces and thus bring the war to a close.

TERENCE JEANSANNE.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13th February, A. D. 1864.

JOHN MACDONALD,

Justice of the Peace.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.] STATE OF LOUISIANA, Parish of Saint Landry:

Be it know that on 13th day of February, 1864, before me, the undersigned, justice of the peace in and for the parish of Saint Landry, personally came and appeared Joseph B. Young, of said parish and State, who, being duly sworn according to law, upon his honor declared that on the 12th of this month 4 armed men came to his house, situated about 10 miles west of Opelousas, who represented themselves as being Confederate soldiers, cocked their guns on him and took a horse from the yard belonging to said affiant. About three houses after the first squad left, they returned with about 12 more men, all armed, among whom were 4 or 5 free men of color, forcibly entered the house, and took affiant's gun and blankets, and from the yard another horse with a bridle and saddle. While there they cocked a gun at hi swift and threatened to shoot her. One of the men was hunting about the house for affiant, and told his wife that he wanted to kill every damned Confederate he could find. After the above circumstances affiant was on his way to Opelousas and stopped at Madam Placide Guindny's, and while there another squid of armed men came and took from him another horse, saddle, and bridle. Affiant is [convinced] that the men were not Confederate soldiers, but jayhawkers or robbers.

JOS. B. YOUNG.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13th day of February, A. D. 1864.

JOHN MACDONALD,

Justice of the Peace.