War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0712 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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another department, the southern district headquarters must be shifted to Fort Gibson, where I will try to concentrate a sufficient base of operations to maintain our position, and if possible do more. I see orders are very conflicting concerning the muster of the Indian officers. A letter from the War Department complains of musters in on your appointments and directs all such to be mustered out from date of their muster in, but Major Weed says he has letters which authorizes the muster on the assignment to duty, which I presume will induce a revocation of this last order. I am required to ask your explanation as to why you assumed the prerogatives of the honorable the Secretary of War, which explanation you will please make through General Blunt, to whom the matter was referred.

I remain, colonel, very truly, your friend.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINN., DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., March 23, 1864

Major General JOHN POPE,

Milwaukee:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith copy of a dispatch* dated 15th instant, from Major J. R. Brown, special military agent at Fort Abercrombie. It indicates very strongly the desire and intention of the Sissetons not to participate in further hostilities against the Government, while the information corroborates that obtained from other quarters, that the Yanktonais have invited the disaffected of the other bands of Sioux to join them, and are determined to attack any boats or parties found within the limits of their country. I expect further intelligence very soon the general movements and intentions of the several bands.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINN., DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., March 23, 1864

Major General JOHN POPE,

Milwaukee:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that Major J. R. Brown, special military agent, arrived some days ago at Fort Abercrombie from Pembina, having in charge 90 men, women, and children of the Sioux tribe, who surrendered themselves to Major Hatch during the winter. There were originally 21 men, 31 women, and 39 children, but 1 man died suddenly on the way. I have ordered all the prisoners to Fort Snelling under guard, and as among the men there are several who were deeply engaged in the outrages perpetrated on this frontier in 1862, I propose, with your sanction, to try the men by a military commission, and to turn over the women and children to the Indian Department for transportation to the Sioux Reservation

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*Not found.

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