War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0686 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTH KANSAS,

Paola, March 21, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Company C, Fifteenth Kansas Vol. Cava., Paola, Kans.:

SIR: The general commanding the district directs that you proceed with your command immediately to the eastern border of Miami County, and that you take post at some convenient point and patrol the country as far south as Trading Post, and at least as far north as West Point road. You will keep in communication with the detachment at Coldwater Grove.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE S. HAMPTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTH KANSAS,

Paola, March 21, 1864.

Lieutenant JOHN MURPHY,

Co. B, 15th Regiment Kans. Cav., Commanding Detach.,

Cold Springs, Kans.:

LIEUTENANT:

* * * * * *

Your dispatch of this morning is received. I send you by return of messenger the paper and envelopes required. The general commanding the district directs me to say that you will not go into Missouri, except upon express orders from these headquarters or upon the request of the commanding officer of some post in Missouri opposite you for assistance in case of emergency, unless you are in close pursuit of the enemy. In such an event you are authorized to disregard lines and follow them into Missouri, reporting the fact at once to these headquarters and to the nearest post in Missouri to you. Report any important information immediately to these headquarters. Company C, Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry, will be at Rockville by noon to-day.

Yours, very respectfully,

GEORGE S. HAMPTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NEBRASKA,

Omaha, Nebr. Ter., March 21, 1864.

Governor A. SAUNDERS,

Governor of Nebraska Territory:

SIR: In reply to the communication of E. McCracken, of Nebraska City, referred by you to these headquarters, I have the honor to state that, on my way to assume command here, I deemed it advisable to, and with the means at my command did, inform myself as to the condition of affairs in the southern portion of this district. The information I obtained from highly respectable citizens of that vicinity, and of the most undoubted loyalty, induced me to form very different opinions from those expressed by Mr. McCracken in his communication. These opinions were confirmed by the reports of the military officers stationed in the southern part of the district.