War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0645 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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anything more than what General Dana's satisfactory response to the same contemplated. The general commanding only desires reports of progress to be made at stated intervals, in order that he might be advised respecting the same, and enabled to report accordingly to department headquarters.

By command of Major General John A. McClernand:

SAMUEL CALDWELL,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Pass Cavallo, Tex., March 18, 1864.

Major-General DANA:

I am directed by the general commanding to inform you that Captain Wingett's company of mounted infantry (say 50 or 60 men) and Captain Armstrong's scouts (13 men), all under command of Captain Wingett, have been stationed in parties as couriers at intervals of 5 miles between the Englishman's and the foot of this sand, with instructions to report to Colonel Bailey, Ninety-ninth Illinois, commanding outposts, to these headquarters, and to your headquarters. These mounted men and scouts took with them rations and forage for ten days, from the 16th to the 25th instant. It is desired that you will cause them to be further furnished with such supplies from time to time as may be required; also with any additional ammunition they may require. it is suggested that Colonel Bailey, from his position on the line of couriers, might be appropriately charged with the duty of executing these instructions. Your own decision, however, will control in this respect.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL CALDWELL,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL, HDQRS. 13TH ARMY CORPS,

Pass Cavallo, Tex., March 18, 1864.

Major-General MCCLERNAND,

Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the line of couriers between the lower end of Matagorda Island and these headquarters is established. Captain Armstrong, commanding Texas scouts, has his headquarters at the head of the Two Bayous, between which is the path to the Oyster Reef, and has one post of pickets at the State Channel through the reef. The first post of mounted infantry coring from the scouts is 1 1/2 miles beyond the residence of Mr. Blendworth, and the station of Captain Wingett, commanding mounted infantry, is at 3 miles this side, east of the same. This is the narrowest place on the island, and is designated as a rallying point in case of attack. The men are posted at intervals of 5 miles from that point to the residence of Mr. Wilkinson.

I find the second island, crossing the reef, an excellent point of defense, and believe that 15 or 20 resolute men could resist a regiment of cavalry and prevent their crossing the State Channels, which is cut just along the edge of the island. The approach is across a plain oyster reef, narrow, and of such a character as to prevent a rapid movement, and the shells thrown up by the dredging machine