War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0628 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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Besides the usual siege guns the governor has mounted on the fortifications 28 field pieces belonging to the command of General Doblado. These last had been forwarded here in January, supposing them safe in keeping of Governor Vidauri. I hoisted my flag yesterday as soon as I found the city abandoned, and will keep it flying until the danger is over.

Active preparations are being made in Western Texas to attack the U. S. forces at Brownsville. A force of 2,100 men were at Fort Ewell, Nueces River, the 2nd instant. I keep General Herron regularly advised of all reliable information in regard to the movements of the rebels on the upper Rio Grande.

A large amount of cotton is accumulating at Eagle Pass. All cotton crossing the Rio Grande belonging to the rebel Government is seized by parties here, whom they are owing for army supplies furnished. A recent order of General Kirby Smith forbids the exportation of cotton to Mexico, and orders the seizure of all Mexican property in Texas. Refugees still keep coming. I send those who are without means to Brownsville.

Your obedient servant,

M. M. KIMMEY,

U. S. Vice-Consul.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, March 16, 1864.

Colonel S. B. HOLABIRD,

Chief Quartermaster, New Orleans:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding desires you o furnish transportation to the chief commissary of the department for 600,000 rations, in steam-boats suitable for the navigation of Red River as far as Alexandria.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, March 16, 1864.

Colonel E. G. BECKWITH,

Chief Commissary, Department of the Gulf:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding desires that you send 600,000 rations to the mouth of the Red River, in charge of an efficient officer of your department, to be held there afloat, subject to the orders of the major-general commanding. These rations should be sent in boats suitable for the navigation of Red River as far as Alexandria.

Should the gun-boat fleet pass Fort De Russy, leaving no obstruction to the navigation, the officer you send in charge will follow the fleet and report his stores at Alexandria or such other points as may be occupied by the forces under the major-general commanding.

Very respectfully, colonel, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.