War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0627 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ECT.-UNION.

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as to detect the approach of my hostile party. These orders should be given so as not to create unnecessary alarm among the settlers. You will also direct the two cavalry companies stationed at Fort Ridgely to examine the country on each side of the Minnesota River frequently, and to follow up any traces of an enemy wit vigilance and determination. No hostile party venturing near the settlements must be allowed to escape destruction.

By command of Brigadier-General Sibley:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. OLIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 16, 1864.

Hon E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose for your information a copy of a dispatch received this day from M. M. Cam, U. S. vice-consul at Monterey, dated 12th ultimo, announcing the arrival of the President of Mexico at that city, accompanied by General Doblado and his forces, and also stating that active preparations are being made in Western Texas to attack the U. S. forces at Brownsville.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.]

U. S. CONSULATE AT MONTEREY, MEXICO,

February 12, 1864.

Hon WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: President Juarez arrived here this morning, accompanied by General Doblado and his forces, numbering about 3,000 men. On account of the unsettled state of affairs here between the President and Governor Vidauri it is impossible to say what the coming few days may bring forth.

The President notified Governor Vidauri on the 5th instant that he would leave Saltillo on the 9th, and had ordered General Doblado to march with his command on the 7th. Every arrangement was made to receive the President here on the 10th. Suddnely, and for some reason still unknown to us, active preparations were made to put the citadel in a defensive condition.

President Juarez was notified to remain with his forces at Santa Catarina, a small town 9 miles from here. Governor Vidauri went to the citadel in the afternoon of the 10th and remained there until yesterday morning. I saw the governor at the palace yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He told me then that all misunderstandings wee arranged; that President Juarez with his cabinet and principal officers would come to the city, but the forces would be sent to some other point.

At 3 o'clock the governor, hearing of some movements, suspicious, abandoned the palace, taking with him to the citadel all his forces. He is still there, strongly fortified, and has provisions sufficient for a siege of several days.