War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0440 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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armed, have been passing across the road near Cross Hollow nightly, and in bands of 4 or 5, for the last ten days. I am endeavoring to ascertain who they are and where they are going. I suggested that it would be well to call Colonel Bishop's attention to the matter. They may be bush whackers and may be emigrating to the gold mines west.

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

MACON, Mo., February 27, 1864.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: Since my return home I have made much inquiry of the loyal people as to the condition and necessities of North Missouri. The opinion is general that but few troops are needed. There is also but one voice as to the district commander. Send us John McNeil, Fisk, or some other good man, who has at least as much sympathizer. Such is the sentiment of North Missouri. This change should be made at once, and this military inquisition, called a military commission, organized by Guitar dissolved at once. To huzzah for James H. Lane is a crime up here; nay, more, to criticism the acts and doings of the provisional government is also a crime. These are punished by imprisonment in cold, miserable shanties, called guardhouses. When will this tyranny and oppression cease? We hope to see its end soon.

Your friend,

A. L. GILSTRAP.

MACON, Mo., February 27, 1864.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: In pursuance of the promise made to you in Saint Louis, I proceed to the discharge of the duty incumbent upon me.

A rebellion exists in nearly all the slave States of the Union, and has assumed the dignity of a belligerent power-a de facto government-of which Missouri is claimed by that government to be an integral part of the Confederate States. Missouri is represented in the Confederate Congress, and all citizens of the State who adhere to the cause of the rebellion are recognized as citizens of that de facto government by the Executive thereof.

The Federal Government has the military possession of the State, and the people of Missouri, as a political community, have refused from first to last to go into that de facto government. But the Federal Government in various ways, and properly so, has admitted the existence of the Confederate Government de facto, and has conceded to citizens of Missouri, in arms against it within the State, the rights and treatment of prisoners of war of the de facto Confederate States. From these facts the following propositions arise in pursuance of the laws of this country:

First. The Federal Government has the legal right to declare in force the law martial within the State, and to enforce it against all