War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0436 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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SAINT LOUIS, Mo., February 27, 1864.

Brigadier General CLINTON B. FISK,

Commanding Saint Louis District, Mo.:

GENERAL:

SAINT LOUIS, Mo., February 27, 1864.

Brigadier General CLINTON B. FISK,

Commanding Saint Louis District, Mo.:

GENERAL: In obedience to Special Orders, Numbers 38, issued from headquarters post of Saint Louis, Mol, dated February 24, 1864, I proceeded to Cuba, Crawford County, Mo., to investigate the present state of affairs there, and to discover if, in the present condition of things and the coming draft, any troops should be dent in that section. The said order was based upon an letter from Mr. Evans, provost-marshal of that country, to Captain Manwaring, which said letter I herewith annex at this my report. I would respectfully submit, general, that I found the facts set out in said letter true. The murders therein spoken of were committed near Roll, Mo., and the murderers were pursued and 1 at least of them killed by troops from Roll, Mo. There have been no depredations committed in Crawford County by guerrillas. Their cruelties have for a long time been confined to the region about Roll.

Cuba is distant but 30 miles from Roll, at which latter place there are, I am informed, six companies of troops-a force, I think, amply sufficient for the protection of that vicinity. There are copperheads and a number of rebels lately returned from General Price's rebel army in Crawford County. These generally congregate in the whisky shops on the neighborhood and there do considerable disloyal talking, I have no doubt, but I do not think this is more usual in that county than any other western county, and not so much so as in some. There may be difficulty in the execution of the draft, but I doubt it. Mr. Evans himself could not say that he really apprehended it, and further said that he thought 20 soldiers would do to assist him in arresting deserters, &c. In conclusion, general, I could not recommend the establishment of a force at the point named, unless there are forces at other points where they are not needed. The force at Roll can give assistance to Crawford County whenever necessary.

I have the honor, general, to be, your obedient servant,

JAMES M. McKELVY,

Captain Company I, Seventh Regiment Minnesota Volunteers.

[Inclosure.]

CUBA, MO., February 13, 1864.

Captain C. C. MANWARING,

Provost-Marshal:

SIR: Up to this time I have never asked for a guard or armed assistance, but do you not think that it would be well to have a few soldiers in this county now, for a few weeks, until the draft fever subsides? In these parts there is considerable feeling against conscripting, and much anxiety among sympathizers, who are numerous in a scope of country surrounding me, and there are no soldiers in this country. The bush whackers are now putting in their best licks. They said to old man Wade, whom they shot a few days ago (now dead), that their army could not come back to Missouri and that they were going to have revenge on Union citizens. This week 12 guerrillas rode up to Mr. Fulks' farm, 8 miles from Roll, and shot Mr. Faulks dead. The old man had never been in the service nor interfered much in the strife going on. Now, I am no alarmist. I voted for Lincoln here, have been a Radical from the beginning, and have done by utmost for the cause of the Union and freedom, but have