War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0403 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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has been decreasing. Among the citizens I cannot see any abatement of small-pox. I have, however, adopted such plans as will prevent its further spread. The policing of the town has also been much improved. The Twenty-sixth Indiana and one of the batteries have re-enlisted and will go forward by next steamer.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

F. J. HERRON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Matagorda Bay, Tex., February 23, 1864.

Brigadier General FITZ HENRY WARREN,

Commanding at Indianola:

I have just received your dispatches of to-day relating to the disgraceful affair of Captain Benter's. Such scrapes are very much to be regretted, and ought to be carefully avoided, as in addition to the losses and mortification they lay on us they give great encouragement to the enemy. This must have resulted from gross carelessness, and I have ordered Captain Benter to report back again to you, as I presume from the tone of your letter you will wish to order his immediate triad. I ordered General Benton to try Captain Wingett. I wish you would report the decision and sentence in his case. Captain Benter reports that the enemy called his name, and appeared to know that he would be out there, and that refugees and deserters report that our affairs in Indianola are known in the interior. How can this be? Is it possible there are escapes at night or at any time through the picket-lines? The enemy will of course have spies in your camp, if there are modes of communicating information.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully,

N. J. T. DANA,

Major-General.

LITTLE ROCK, February 23, 1864.

(Received 8.30 p. m., 24th.)

Major-General HALLECK:

GENERAL: I am informed that General Davidson is going straight to Washington for the purpose of political intrigue. I hope he will not be allowed to go there. He has been endeavoring to induce the same state of affairs here that existed in Missouri under Schofied. He had a hand in that, too. He is unscrupulous in regard to truth.

Respectfully,

FRED'S STEELE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., February 23, 1864.

Major-General STEELE,

Little Rock, Ark.:

Can you occupy Pocahontas with adequate force to close that route into Missouri; if not, will you permit me to do it? Best regards and wishes.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.