War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0340 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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ing to Fort Smith, and it is the more urgent because there is a difference of opinion prevailing among the troops themselves, and we have enough of bickerings among them without allowing this to demoralize them.

The co-called Army of the Frontier headquarters are Fort Smith, where the district headquarters were, and divisions and brigades are distributed on both sides of the line between Arkansas and the Indian Territory. I do not desire the command of an inch of territory or a corporal's guard beyond my proper limits and the common safety seems to require. I am expected to do more than I can by the anxious people of the country.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

MILWAUKEE, WIS., February 15, 1864.

(Received 8.25 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

Is there not some mistake in ordering the Second Minnesota Cavalry South? This is the only cavalry regiment in Minnesota, being the First Mounted Rangers, reorganized at my request for service in Minnesota. As the use of this regiment is specified in my plan of Indian campaign approved by you, I think there must be mistake in ordering it South.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

MILWAUKEE, WIS., February 15, 1864.

Brigadier General H. H. SIBLEY, Saint Paul, Minn.:

Please come here as soon as convenient, to confer on Indian campaign. Telegraph what day you will reach here.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINN., DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., February 15, 1864.

Major General JOHN POPE, Milwaukee:

GENERAL: I can arrange to leave for Milwaukee on 22nd. If my presence is indispensable before 24th, please telegraph immediately.

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 16, 1864-1 p. m.

Major-General GRANT, Nashville:

According to General Bank's last dispatch (February 7), Admiral Farragut was to threaten Mobile, in order to draw the enemy from Sherman and Thomas. As soon as Sherman's present expedition is terminated (about the 1st of March) it was understood that he and General Banks would move up Red River to meet Steele's advance against Shreveport. This was General Banks' plan, if Sherman and Steele could co-operate with him. Sherman had agreed, but Steele