War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0281 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

see from inclosed report* of Major Fischer, from Waynesville, that his neighborhood is infested by these marauders in the same manner. By report* of Lieutenant Bates you will also see that he was successful in killing 7 of them and wounding several more, and capturing a lot of property. A sergeant just in from Waynesville informs me that a small escort belonging to that post en route from Gasconade to Waynesville, and 9 miles west of the latter place, were attacked, and 1 man severely wounded, and 1 captured. I shall be able to give particulars when a scout now after them returns.

This list of depredations will show that there is plenty of work for one small command to attend to. I have at the present time six scouting parties out in this district, and shall endeavor to hunt down and exterminate these bands wherever they may be found, but I anticipate a continuance of these depredations as long as the weather will permit these bands to lie out in the woods. The country south of the Springfield road is exhausted of nearly all kinds of supplies. These bands are therefore compelled to rely on their robbing and waylaying wagons on the roads for subsistence. We have a large number of rebel sympathizers living in this district, who are on every opportunity aiding and abetting these marauders, otherwise it would be impossible for them to do all this mischief. As this communication is somewhat lengthy, I hope I have not intruded too much on your patience. I shall continue to keep you advised of things transpiring in this district during my term of command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. A. EPPSTEIN,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding District.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI,

Springfield, Mo., February 9, 1864.

Captain CAMERON,

Cassville, Mo.:

You will at once forward to Berryville a large portion of your bread, sugar, coffee, and salt rations now in Cassville, reserving only sufficient to supply the small garrison at Cassville two or three days until other rations arrive. The object is to be sure and get rations across the river while it is fordable. I will start a train from here to-morrow or next day with about 18,000 rations for Berryville, and the quartermaster is ordered to construct a flat-boat at once. The Second Arkansas will operate hereafter mainly from Berryville, and received its rations and forage there, but the headquarters will not be changed until it is fully organized. Have the trains that go to Berryville with rations load back to Cassville with forage. Send Colonel Phelps a copy of this dispatch.

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

FORT GIBSON, IND. TER., February 9, 1864.

(Received 10.30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Colonel Phillips, 60 miles in advance, drove the rebels beyond Canadian. Some skirmishing, in which we had 1 man severely

---------------

*Not found.

---------------