War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0217 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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and also to confer with President Lincoln in regard to other important matters. Governor Ruiz desires that our Government be notified of this.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

F. J. HERRON,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

MIL. AND CIVIL HDQRS. OF THE STATE OF TAMAULIPAS,

Saltillo, January 16, 1864.

GOVERNOR AND MILITARY COMMANDER OF THE STATE OF TAMAULIPAS,

Matamoras:

SIR: Mr. Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, minister of foreign relations for the Constitutional Government of the Republic of Mexico, by supreme order of the 16th of the present month, has notified me of the following: From divers information received through the United States of America, it is understood that Mr. Jose Domingo Cortes has represented himself there as being commissioned by Mexico for some purpose; and having a knowledge of the antecedents of the said Jose Domingo Cortes, the President of the Republic has been pleased to determine that he should be expelled from the territory of the Republic as being a pernicious stranger, and that you will give an order to that effect, as it is known that he is in that State.

LERDO DE TEJADA.

[Indorsement.]

BROWNSVILLE, January 22, 1864.

Major General F. J. HERRON,

Present:

I have the honor to inform Major-General Herrorn, commanding U. S. forces now in Brownsville, of this order, for his special knowledge, taking this opportunity to renew my obedience and respect.

MANUEL RUIZ.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES ON THE RIO GRANDE,

Brownsville, Tex., January 26, 1864.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: We have had many rumors from the interior of Mexico during the past week, but it is difficult to get them in tangible shape. From Captain Jones, of an English war vessel, who left Vera Cruz on January 2, 1864, and who called upon me here, I learn that guerrillas had cut the line of communication between Vera Cruz and Pueblo, and that a train destined to the French had been destroyed. There were but few troops at Vera Cruz, and this affair created considerable stir. Captain Jones heard a great deal of talk of a move against Matamoras, but could see no signs of an expedition fitting out at that place. President Juarez is still at Saltillo, and has officially announced that place as the seat of government. A portion of the rebel Mexican army held San Louis Potosi, at last accounts, while from Monterey I learn that an expedition is moving from Zacatecas against the French force at and near San Luis.