War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0139 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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side of the village, where I halted for an hour and fed my horses, having made a march of 50 miles. From this point I returned direct to Batesville, where I arrived at midnight of the 14th, having met with no further incidents. Distance traveled, 85 miles. I consider it my duty to state that the officers and men of my command behaved in a most admirable manner; no depredations were committed, and the officers were very efficient in maintaining discipline.

I remain, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS J. MAJORS,

Captain Co. C, First Regiment Nebr. Cav., Commanding Expedition.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, January 23, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel HERDER,

Pilot Knob:

You will come to De Soto on this day's train and settle the increasing and perplexing troubles in relation to the opening of saloons at that place and Victoria. I am daily called upon by parties from both points. Go there and make such regulations as will protect the service, and not be oppressive to the residents or travelers on the railroad. Visit Saint Louis before you return and consult with me personally.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., January 23, 1864.

General EWING, JR.,

Kansas City, Mo.:

The Second Colorado ought to be distributed in three or four days from now. The colonel is directed to send you a courier, when he is posted, which will be sufficient for you to act upon.

O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, January 23, 1864.

Colonel WOODSON,

Provost-Marshal, Saint Joseph:

DEAR COLONEL: I am in receipt of yours of the 19th instant concerning the conduct of persons in Elwood, Kans., in regard to horse thieves who cross to this side of the Missouri. I send an officer, Major Hunt, with large discretionary powers, to act in the premises. State lines are always convenient for thieves and I hope to help the matter. Last year, by arranging military districts, officers could act promptly on either side. As now arranged we must rely on common sense and proper courtesy to keep up harmonious action and preserve the peace of the border. My officers are already instructed to co-operate with those of adjoining departments, and the officer at Elwood should have taken up the matter of which you speak. I