War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0054 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., January 10, 1864.

Colonel BONNEVILLE, Benton Barracks, Mo.:

The Second Colorado may be detained a day or two. Let Colonel Ford come to headquarters to-morrow morning.

O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FORT LARNED, KANS., January 10, 1864.

ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Hdqrs. District of the Border, Kansas City, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following statement to the commanding general of the district, and respectfully ask for instructions for my future guidance: There are encamped at this time in the vicinity of this post a tribe, or part of a tribe, of Indians known as the Caddoes, about 300 in number. They are partially civilized, and were driven by the rebels from the State of Texas in consequence of their adherence to the Government of the United States. Being unaccustomed to living as the Indians do who inhabit these plains, they are in a destitute and starving condition. They frequently come to these headquarters and represent that they are suffering from hunger, and I have issued provisions to them in small quantities at different times, but not enough to materially benefit so large a number. It seems absolutely necessary to do something for them in order for them to live, but as I have no warrant to issue to them except in small quantities, and do not wish to do anything in the premises without proper authority, I take this means to acquaint the commanding general with the circumstances, and shall in the mean time await further instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. N. F. READ,

Captain, Ninth Kansas Cavalry, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NEBRASKA, Omaha City, January 10, 1864.

Major JOHN S. WOOD,

Commanding Fort Kearney, Nebr. Ter.:

MAJOR: I am directed by the general commanding the district to say that the inferior quality of the hay in this section of the country, and the unprecedented severity of the winter, require great attention on the part of officers and men to the public animals under their charge, and that it is expected you will take measures to preserve the forage from waste, and to insure the utmost care in grooming, watering, and feeding, to the end that your stock may get through the winter in proper condition. There will be but little service during the winter for your mounts, and it is to be hoped that they at least may be kept in fair condition, notwithstanding the unfavorable circumstances above mentioned. The general also requires you to see that the acting assistant quartermaster at your