War of the Rebellion: Serial 062 Page 0021 Chapter XLVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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they do so during the present cold weather. Stoves are not issued to troops in the field. Furnaces made by a trench through the tent covered with flat stones and earth, with a flat chimney, or when cantonments are on hill-sides, excavations are easily made and fire places built. As soon as the weather moderates, your command will be put in cantonments. Most of the regiment will be kept at Warrensburg. In the meantime you will please have your company commanders provide themselves with the necessary tools, axes, shovels, picks, &c., to build proper protection for the men and horses. You speak of dissatisfaction among the men if my orders are carried out. I regret to have seen so unmilitary a sentiment in your letter. If there is any manifestation of mutinous conduct, the fault and cause is with the company officers, and you will please see that they are held to a proper accountability for it. Your regiment care pu in cantonment, the men made comfortable in two days, and the horses protected at any place where there is timber, with proper energy on the part of the company officers.

I am truly, your obedient servant,

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Jefferson City, Mo., January 4, 1864.

Dr. S. H. SOUNDERS,

Otterville, Mo.:

MY DEAR DOCTOR: Your favor of this date has been received. The troops were moved to the La Mine bridge to meet a reported raid. The extreme cold weather has driven them into buildings for protection. They occupy the towns along the railroad, and there are reason why these, as well as those stationed at Otterville, should be removed . Under the circumstances you will see how impracticable it is to move the two companies, as you suggest, went here is no special cause of complaint. I fully appreate the feeling of the people in their apprehensions of injury from those who should be their protector, but I doubt whether the disposition manifested to drive away the men who have periled their lives to protect their country, now, in the midst of a piercing cold winter, has a ten- dency to remove the cause of fear from their doors. I will say, however, that as soon as the weather will permit, I shall move the troops into cantonment removed from any town.

I am, very truly, your obedient servant,

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI,

Springfield, Mo., January 4, 1864.

Colonel JOHN E. PHELPS,

Commanding Second Arkansas Cavalry:

Your horses should sent to some point where there is forage until some can be accumulated at Cassville. General McNeil thinks