War of the Rebellion: Serial 060 Page 0827 Chapter XLV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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Cavalry, with their horses. Arriving at Salisbury on the evening of the 5th, I placed myself in communication with the leading Union citizens within reach, and from their information and at their request I sent detachments, at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 6th, to the following districts of Somerset County, Md., viz: Quantico district, 1 non-commissioned officer and 9 men (infantry), distance 9 miles from Salisbury; to Barren Creek district, 12 miles from Salisbury, 1 non-commissioned officer and 5 men (cavalry); to Trappe district, distance 8 miles from Salisbury, 1 non-commissioned officer and 9 men (infantry); to Princess Anne district, distance 15 miles from Salisbury, 1 sergeant and 7 men (cavalry); to Dublin district, distance 15 miles from Salisbury, 1 non-commissioned officer and 5 men (cavalry). In Worcester County the following detachments were sent: To Nutter's district, distant 4 miles from Salisbury, 1 non-commissioned officer and 9 men (infantry); to Colbourne's district, distant 12 miles from Salisbury, 1 commissioned officer and 7 men (infantry), and to Cross-Roads district, distant 12 miles from Salisbury, 1 commissioned officer and 7 men (infantry). These two last detachments were sent in ambulance obtained from Adjutant Rastall, First Eastern Shore Maryland Regiment Infantry. The officers and non-commissioned officers commanding these detachments had orders to march within 1 mile of the election precinct and then notify the judges of their presence and that they were ready to render them any protection and assistance that was asked for. In but two instances were they thus called on-at Nutter's and Colbourne's districts in Worcester County. To both of these requests the commanding officers of the detachments promptly replied by marching their men to the election precinct and remained until they were informed by the judges of election that their presence was no longer necessary. By midnight all the detachments had returned to Salisbury, and I am happy to report that their conduct was excellent throughout. I left Salisbury yesterday at noon and arrived here with my troops last evening at 7 p. m.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOHN R. KENLY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CULPEPER COURT-HOUSE, VA.,

April 9, 1864.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

For information, and as instructions to govern your preparations for the coming campaign, the following is communicated confidentially, for your own perusal alone:

So far as practicable, all the armies are to move together and toward one common center. Banks has been instructed to turn over the guarding of the Red River to General Steele and to the navy, to abandon Texas with the exception of the Rio Grande, and to concentrate all the force he can-not less than 25,000 men-to move on Mobile. This he is to do without reference to any other movements. From the scattered condition of his command, however, he cannot possibly get it together to leave New Orleans before the 1st of May, if so soon.

Sherman will move at the same time you do, or two or three days