War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0762 Chapter XLIV. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

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rected to deliver them to you. I was informed at Okolona on yesterday that a train would be furnished me at West Point on Monday next, to which place I shall proceed at once and should be pleased to receive from you instructions as to the point to which you may desire them carried.

I am, general, with high respect, your obedient servant,

S. J. GHOLSON,

Major-General, Commanding, &c.

HEADQUARTERS LORING'S DIVISION,

Montevallo, Ala., April 9, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report to arrival of my entire command at this point. There is no forage to be had at this place or its vicinity, and I shall be compelled to rely on Selma and its surrounding county. I find upon arrival that there is no telegraph line between this place and Selma. If I can be furnished with wire I will have the poles cut and the line established.

With respect, your obedient servant,

W. W. LORING,

Major-General, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OF ALABAMA,

Montgomery, April 9, 1864.

General GIDEON J. PILLOW,

Montgomery, Ala.:

GENERAL: Inclosed I send you a copy of a letter I have this day received from Colonel M. W. Hannon, informing me of the concentration by the enemy of a heavy force at Decatur. I deem the information reliable, and send you this letter that you may be informed, and may take the necessary steps to meet this demonstration by the enemy.

Very respectfully, yours,

T. H. WATTS,

Governor of Alabama.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. HANNON'S CAV. Brigadier, RODDEY'S DIVISION,

Camp near Dalton, Ga., April 7, 1864.

Governor T. H. WATTS:

DEAR SIR: Having learned through General Roddey that the enemy are concentrating a heavy force at Decatur, North Ala., for the purpose of making a raid on Selma. I demit my duty, and have his consent, to apprise you of the fact. He says the information is reliable, and has come to him per courier-line in a remarkably short time, only three days having elapsed since the courier started. We have given the information to General Johnston, but I fear he will not feel the importance of immediate action as much as we do. The force of the enemy will be led by the celebrated Grierson, of Mississippi notoriety, and in my judgment it will require some such man as Forrest or Roddey to thwart him. A portion of General Roddey's command left yesterday, under Colonel Patterson, for North Alabama. This force, however, was mostly composed of raw