War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0715 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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condition since December. I believe that large numbers might be purchased in Alabama and Mississippi, and respectfully suggest that orders to collect them immediately be given to the proper officers.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

[First indorsement.]

APRIL 5, 1864.

Respectfully referred to the honorable Secretary of War, through Adjutant and Inspector General's Office.

The paragraph in the letter from Commissary-General of Subsistence Office is unfortunate; can do no good, and may do harm.

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

[Second indorsement.]

APRIL 10, 1864.

COMMISSARY-GENERAL:

For consideration, giving special attention to the sentence most complained of, and for remarks.

J. A. S.,

Secretary.

[Third indorsement.]

APRIL 13, 1864.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL:

For report as to that portion of General Johnston's letter that refers to his limited means of transportation.

J. A. S.,

Secretary.

[Fourth indorsement.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

April 15, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Inspector-General of Field Transportation for a report of the number of animals that have been called for by General Johnston's chief quartermaster, and the number furnished.

By order of Quartermaster-General:

W. F. ALEXANDER,

Major and Assistant to the Quartermaster-General.

[Inclosure.]

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., March 4, 1864.

The Commissary-General of Subsistence directs me to give you the following extracts from a letter written by him to the Adjutant and Inspector General, for your information and guidance:

The duties of a chief commissary of an army in the field (not the chief purchasing commissary of a State) are:

First. To organize with the chief quartermaster the brigade and division trains, which are assigned to carry supplies, the former for immediate use, the latter for replenishing the first and hurrying forward supplies from points selected on conference with the Commissary-General of Subsistence for furnishing the train for hospital supplies needed for sick and wounded.

Second. He must see that strict adherence is observed by the army commissary to the necessities of his supplying or reducing the rations.