War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0679 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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number of citizens of Rogersville for your attention. I am directed to say on this subject that may leave a force there of 100 mounted men under a good officer. The point will constitute a good outpost and the remainder of Vaughn's force may move back toward Kingsport.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. SORREL,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Greenville, Tenn., March 27, 1864.

Brigadier General G. C. WHARTON,

Commanding Brigade:

The commanding general desires that your brigade should not halt at Jonesborough, as directed in my note of last night. You will continue you march, as indicated in General Orders, Numbers 33, from these headquarters.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. SORREL,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Greeneville, East Tenn., March 27, 1864.

Brigadier General T. JORDAN,

Chief of Staff, Dept. of S. C., Ga., and Fla.:

GENERAL: Your latter of the 19th and the general's telegram were received yesterday. I send a copy of my letter to the President,* which will explain my proposition for the spring campaign in the West.

The troops in this department are living on half ration of meat and bread, without an y good reason to hope for better prospects. Our animals re in the same condition, with the hope of getting grass in a mouth more. Supplies seem to be about as scarce all over the Confederacy. It seems a necessity, therefore, that we should advance, and this route seems to offer more ready and complete relief than any other. If we had an abundance of supplies it seems to me that we should go into Kentucky as a political move.

If we retain our present position the enemy will, in the course of a few months, be able to raise large additional forces, and when entirely ready he will again concentrate his forces upon some point, and will eventually get possession, and he will continue to proceed in the same way to the close of the chapter. If we go into Kentucky, and can there unite with General Johnston's army, we shall have force enough to hold. The enemy will be more of less demoralized and dishearten by the great loss of territory which he will sustain, and he will find great difficulty in getting men enough to operate with before the elections in the fall, when in all probability Lincoln will be defeated and peace will follow in the spring.

The political opponents of Mr. Lincoln can furnish no reason at this late day against the war so long as it is successful with him, and

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* See inclosure of Longstreet to Johnston, March 16, p. 637.

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