War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0654 Chapter XLIV. KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA.

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and that if we are ready to fight him on our own ground we shall have a very plain course, eighth every chances of success. For that we should make exactly such preparations as you indicate for the forward movement, except that I would have the troops assembled here without delay, to repulse Grant's attack and then make our own,. or should the enemy not take the initiative, do it ourselves. Our first object, then, should be your proposition to bring on a battle on this side of the Tennessee.

Should not the movement from Mississippi precede any advance from this point, so much as to enable those troops to cross the Tennessee before we move? Lieutenant-General Polk through at the end of February that he could send 15,000 cavalry on such an expedition. Even two-thirds of that force might injure the railroads enough to compel the evacuation of Chattanooga; certainly it could make a powerful diversion.

I apprehend no difficulty in procuring food (except meat) and forage. This department can furnish nothing. Its officers receive supplies from those of the subsistence and quartermaster's departments at and beyond Atlanta. The efficient head of the ordnance department has never permitted us to wait for anything that could reasonably be expected from him. I am afraid that the collection of the additional field transportation will require a good deal of time None can be obtained within the limits of my authority.

There has been an unnecessary accumulation of breadstuffs and corn at Mobile, a six months' supply for a much larger force than Major-General Maury's. Half of it will spoil during the summer if left in Mobile. It would be economical, therefore, as well as convenient, to transfer that portion of it to this army.

Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, at Augusta, informs me that the artillery horses required will be furnished by the 1st of April.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

RICHMOND, VA., March 19, 1864.

General LONGSTREET,

Greeneville, Tenn.:

Send at once to General Johnston the other cavalry division referred to in your dispatch to the President of 26th February, which was previously ordered from here.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, VA., March 19, 1864.

General LONGSTREET,

Greenville, Tenn.:

Orders have been issued to you to send Martin's command to General Johnston. This includes more than Martin's division, and was intended to embrace the two additional brigades now under Colonel G. G. Dibrell. The last-named brigades will follow Martin's division at once.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.