War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0649 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Greeneville, Tenn., March 18, 1864.

Major General C. W. FIELD,

Commanding Division:

Wharton's brigade is ordered to move from Harris' Gap (its vicinity) at daylight to-morrow morning for this point, and the lieutenant-general commanding desires that you will have a brigade of your division in its in full time to allow it to get off at the hour indicated.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. SORREL,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD,

Camp Milton, McGirt's Creek, Fla., March 18, 1864.

Lieutenant General JAMES LONGSTREET,

Greeneville, Tenn.:

I regret I cannot assist you. My wagons, horses, and serviceable saddles are totally insufficient for present wants. If your plans were carried out and enemy should take possession of Cumberland Mountain gaps how could you get supplies of ammunition, &c.?

The true maxims of war require us never to abandon our communications, but act on those of the enemy without exposing our own.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

DALTON, March 18, 1864.

General BRAGG,

Richmond:

The enemy have concentrated at Ringgold, drawing troops from Knoxville, as permitted by Longstreet's withdrawal. they are repairing the railroad. Does not this indicate advance? General Polk's infantry (too few to be of use in Mississippi) would greatly strengthen us. I suggest the immediate temporary transfer. Hindman's division has been without a commander for months. Do give it the one I recommend. The senior brigadier, deans, has resigned.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

DALTON, March 18, 1864.

General B. BRAGG,

Richmond:

Your letter, by Colonel Sale, received. Grant is at Nashville. Sherman by last accounts at Memphis. Where Grant is we must except the great Federal effort. We ought therefore to be prepared to beat him here. He has not come back to Tennessee to stand on the defensive. His advance, should we be ready for it, will be advantageous to us. To be ready we must have the troops you name immediate; otherwise we might be beaten, which would decide events. Give us those troops, and if we beat him we allow. Should he not advance we will thus be ready for the offensive. the troops can be fed as easily here as where they now are.

J. E. JOHNSTON.