War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0644 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLIV.

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soldiers, which is so essential to success. It is true a few soldiers have by their efforts been induced to believe their false representations, and thus allow themselves to be prejudiced, but I am happy to state they are very few.

Very respectfully,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS HOOD'S CORPS,

Numbers 40.

Dalton, Ga., March 16, 1864.

I. Guns and colors captured from the enemy in time of battle, being the most valuable trophies of war, as establishing the valor of the troops capturing them, the following instructions are given for the guidance of divisions, brigades, and regimental commanders:

II. When guns are captured one or more slightly wounded men should be detailed to remain with them to prevent their being claimed by troops not engaged in their capture.

III. When colors are captured and the troops are still pressing forward they should be torn from the staff and tied around the waist of one of the men, or sent to the rear by a wounded man.

IV. Commanding officers should see that captured colors are not lost or mislaid, but that they are placed in the capital of the Confederate States, or the capital of the State to which the captors belong, as a proud memorial to future generations of their heroic achievements.

By command of Lieutenant-General Hood:

J. P. WILSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, VA.,

March 16, 1864.

Lieutenant General L. POLK,

Demopolis, Ala.:

General Forrest has no power to relieve an officer and order him to report in person to the department commander. The officer should remain with the command and be tried if amenable to charges.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., March 16, 1864.

Lieutenant General L. POLK,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 1st instant, and have to express regret at my inability to give it an earlier reply. I can well understand that serious embarrassments must exist in the regular administration of the conscript law in your department; but they result, in my judgment, mainly from the irregular action which was established under the authority given to General Johnston, similar to that which you now propose should be instructed to you.