War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0512 KY., SW.VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIV.

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KNOXVILLE, April 27, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have received your letter of instructions of April 24, and Special Orders, No. 35, of April 25. The main body of my troops will be at Charleston on the 30th. Those sent to destroy the railroad will be somewhat later. I will bring them down by railroad as rapidly as possible. The troops coming from Kentucky have not arrived, but must be here in a few days. I have not learned the result of the expedition to the Watauga. The infantry has done its work thoroughly. I have no fears of the rebels ever attempting to rebuild road.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

BULL'S GAP, April 27, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

General Manson was 8 miles above Greeneville last night; says he will reach Lick Creek to-night. The enemy were strongly posted at Watauga, but partially destroyed the bridge themselves. River too high to ford. Our troops skirmished across the river but could not accomplish the entire destruction of the bridge. We lost 3 killed and 18 wounded. Manson has destroyed all bridges from Jonesborough to where he is, and fully one-third of the track, as he reports. I send remainder of the Tennessee regiment and part of the One hundred and fourth Ohio by this train, and remainder of the last by next train if the cavalry get here to make some guard for to-night. The One hundredth Ohio is marching.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

BULL'S GAP, April 27, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

Manson is at Lick Creek and will be in at his old camp, which he left standing, in the morning. How far his men can go to-morrow is doubtful; they are very weary and footsore. I would like to have a train as early as possible to-morrow for the dismounted cavalry and lame infantry. The sick and wounded, with rest of the One hundred and fourth Ohio, go down on the train now here. I will march with Manson's men in the morning, and have the telegraph operator connect with the wire where we halt.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

NICHOLASVILLE, April 27, 1864.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

I leave here day after to-morrow with 2,000 men fitted for the field. Of those I leave behind 2,300 are mounted and equipped and partly armed. The rest have nothing. Of those left behind some have pistols without cases and carbines without slings. My ordnance officer is now in Cincinnati trying to hurry up things, and a thousand