War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0455 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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517, Appendix B, Revised Army Regulations, edition of 1863, and will not be exceeded. The enlisted men will be required to carry their shelter-tents and all their baggage upon their persons.

Attention is called to General Orders, Numbers 7, from headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated Nashville, Ten., April 18, 1864.

By command of Major-General Thomas:

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Numbers 113.

Chattanooga, Tenn., April 22, 1864.

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V. The Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Colonel G. P. Buell, is hereby transferred from the Second Brigade, Second Division, fourth Army Corps, to the Pioneer Brigade, and will report accordingly.

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By command of Major-General Thomas:

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NASHVILLE, April 23, 1864-midnight.

Major General G. H. THOMAS:

Colonel Comstock is here from General Grant, and I expect orders to move quite as early as May 1. I know all the difficulties, but want you to draw in your forces and make every possible preliminary preparation. Cannot one of the gun-boats be got ready to patrol the river from Bridgeport to Guntersville? When McPherson moves on down, all the cavalry to his front will disappear. McPherson's force will be less than we estimated, for A. J. Smith is still at Red River, and his two furloughed divisions are not yet up; therefore, increase your forces as much as possible as far out as the Coosa whence the surplus will be sent back. Can you start with 50,000 counting Garrard as 5,000? Answer.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, Tenn., April 23, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi, Nashville:

GENERAL: Since my telegram to you about going to Nashville I have felt some uncertainty about the propriety of leaving this place for a longer period than one day, for fear something might occur to produce disorder. I wished to see you so as to have a full understanding about our movements, but if you cannot conveniently come down, I can send one of my aides to receive a copy of General Grant's letter to you, if you think it will be prudent to send me one. My