War of the Rebellion: Serial 059 Page 0439 Chapter XLIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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I have rumors from two different sources, but which I cannot deem reliable to the effect that General Jones is on north side of Holston with a brigade, two regiments of infantry and three of cavalry. I wish to ascertain the condition of the most practicable ford (Trogdon's) and collect other information if possible.

H. M. JUDAH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, Tenn., April 21, 1864.

Major General J. B. McPHERSON,

Commanding Dept. and Army of the Tennessee, Huntsville, Ala.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to acknowledge the receipt by the hands of Lieutenant-Colonel Macfeely, of your communications to Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis; Major-General Slocum, Vicksburg and Brigadier-General Brayman, Cairo, and to state that they have been forwarded to their destination, with the following indorsement upon the one addressed to Major-General Hurlbut:

If Forrest has moved south of Coldwater there will be no necessity for Gresham's command going to Purdy, but it will go up to Clifton, land there, and act across to the west of the Tennessee, if information then received make it useful.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

And also the following indorsement upon that of Major-General Slocum:

Approved. No distant expeditions will be expected till you have reason to believe the main armies are in motion. Then all the forces of the United States should occupy the detachments of the enemy as possible.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. ROCHESTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Nashville, Tenn., April 21, 1864

General McPHERSON,

Huntsville:

Dispatches by Macfeely received. Nor did I know there was a garrison at Pillow till I heard it was captured. I broke it up by an order at the same time as Corinth, and now await Hurlbut's reasons for reoccupying it. I knew a regiment of Tennesseeans was forming in the country back, but had no idea that any guns or black troops were there. Hurlbut reports Forrest passed south by La Grange. He seems to have made no efforts to prevent it. Grierson's cavalry ought to be near 7,000, and Smith reports the capture of enough horses and mules to mount all of these at the time he went to Okolona; yet Hurlbut says he could only mount 2,400 men. He has also Buckland's brigade, four other while regiments, and near 4,000 black troops.